What/Why/When/How Product Lifecycle Management!?

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If you work in the Product Lifecycle Management industry, you’re probably used to philosophical debates over what PLM is and isn’t, as well as whether we should stick with the word PLM or coin a new one. These issues are discussed at conferences, on the internet, in your client’s boardroom, and at your Product Lifecycle Management user’s workstation. What/Why PDM? Previously, things were designed on paper, data was shared via drawings, and revisions were accepted with a simple “okay.” Before the mid-twentieth century, the phrase “computer-aided design” (CAD) didn’t exist. No one thought that items would be designed digitally in the near future. It wasn’t that long ago. Earlier professionals huddled over a drawing board, driving to the workshop with a carload of sketches, and signing over the phone the latest design modifications. Even today, when requested to show the installed base of their product, some of them privately admit that the “true” single source of truth is in the basement archive. Not only has CAD transformed the way we design goods. People quickly realized they needed a better approach to managing product data as it became extensively used. Even today, when requested to show the installed base of their product, some of them privately admit that the “true” single source of truth is in the basement archive. Not only has CAD transformed the way we design goods. People quickly realized they needed a better approach to managing product data as it became extensively used.
What/Why PLM? While PDM was an important step toward smart data management, it remained primarily focused on engineering and CAD design. As products became more sophisticated and more disciplines were involved in the design process, a more holistic Product Data Management system was required, one that included teams from all stages of the lifecycle and supported all disciplines, not just engineering. Mechanical CAD (MCAD), Electrical CAD (ECAD), plant and machine control systems, and the complete Office suite of programmers continue to generate ever-increasing amounts of heterogeneous product data. Because the information it contains must be examined throughout the product’s lifecycle, managing this data is a difficult task. PLM connects essential authoring software with corporate core systems like ERP and CRM to allow Product Data to “flow” across the lifecycle in a seamless manner. PLM, which was created to meet the demands of product complexity, comes in a variety of flavors, including multidisciplinary design, supplier integration, and lifecycle collaboration.

What PDM and PLM Systems are out there?

Product Data Management Systems

Now that we’ve covered the theory, let’s look at what PDM systems are out there:
  • SolidWorks PDM: Dassault Systems offers a simple PDM application called SolidWorks PDM. It’s used to manage data files and documentation from SolidWorks.
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  • Vault PDM: Vault PDM is the native PDM application from Autodesk Products. It allows users to store and organize design data and documentation, maintain versions and revisions, reuse designs, and prevent multiple users from modifying the same document simultaneously.

Product Lifecycle Management Systems

Some of the bigger and most well-known Product Lifecycle Management systems are:
  • Aras PLM: Aras is a modern “CAD system-agnostic” PLM solution. It’s web-based and supports companies that need to manage product development, multi-site manufacturing, supply chain operations, and quality compliance in a flexible and scalable way.
  • Dassault Systems 3DExperience: The 3DEXPERIENCE® platform from Dassault systems offers a broad portfolio of technical and business applications, such as CATIA and ENOVIA. The platform enables stakeholders across the enterprise to manage product complexity throughout the lifecycle. It’s one of the most powerful PLM systems out there.
  • KloudPLM: KloudPLM is an Independent PLM system built on native cloud, making it easier for people to adapt to cloud. It is built on salesforce and is one of the highly secured and user friendly applications present in the market.
  • Teamcenter: Teamcenter is Siemens’ PLM system. It connects people and processes across functional silos with a digital thread. Teamcenter is one of the most widely implemented PLM systems out there.
  • PTC Windchill: Windchill is the PLM software from PTC. Windchill is well integrated with simulation tools and widely used by medium-sized enterprises.

What does KloudPLM provide?

The rise of cloud computing and open APIs is upending established PLM companies’ business models and bringing in some intriguing new and smaller players. Cloud PLM companies are here to meet the demand for modern enterprises’ need for fast, smooth information flow and simplicity. As the world progresses, platforms like AWS, Azure, and Salesforce are assisting sectors in modernizing. Even while traditional PLM suppliers have generally avoided industry-specific solutions and open architectures, we are seeing a favorable shift toward simpler systems with modern user interfaces and industry-specific solutions that can cope with the online environment we live in. In the growing cloud industry being unique is being different. KloudPLM provides certain very unique functionalities as mentioned below:
  • Create your own Workflows
  • Design own approvals systems
  • Customizable fields according to need
  • Generate email notifications
  • Wide security options
  • Configure users and their permissions
  • Customizable inter departmental dashboards
  • Clean Project management with gantt chart-timeline solution.
KloudPLM helps you comprehend how to deal with all of the above-mentioned issues. Your investment in a good system will never be in vain, as Benjamin Franklin once observed, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”

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